Oct 22

Johnson & Johnson CEO testified Baby Powder was safe 13 days before FDA bombshell

LOS ANGELES/NEW YORK (Reuters) – Facing off against a plaintiff’s lawyer for the first time about Johnson & Johnson’s Baby Powder, the company’s Chief Executive Alex Gorsky earlier this month insisted that the company’s iconic brand was safe. FILE PHOTO: Johnson & JohnsonÕs Chief Executive Alex Gorsky speaks during a recorded deposition in New York, U.S. October 3, 2019. Simmons Hanly Conroy/Handout via REUTERS. “We unequivocally believe that our talc and our baby powder does not contain asbestos,” Gorsky testified in an Oct. 3 deposition in a case involving a retired Indiana college professor who alleges his cancer was caused by the Baby Powder he used for decades. The deposition has not been previously reported. Gorsky, citing “thousands of tests and studies” to support his testimony, said: “I’m not aware of our baby powder or talc containing asbestos.” That’s harder … Continue reading

Oct 22

More than 100 elephants die in Botswana in suspected anthrax outbreak

FILE PHOTO: The marked carcass of an elephant is seen, after reports that conservationists have discovered 87 of them slaughtered just in the last few months, in the Mababe area, Botswana, September 19, 2018. REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko/File Photo GABORONE (Reuters) – More than 100 elephants have died in Botswana in the past two months partly because of a suspected anthrax outbreak, the government said on Tuesday. “Preliminary investigations suggest the elephants are dying from anthrax whilst some died from drought effects,” a Department of Wildlife and National Parks statement said. “Due to the severe drought, elephants end up ingesting soil while grazing and get exposed to the anthrax bacteria spore,” it said. Elephants Without Borders said an aerial survey showed fresh elephant carcasses increased by 593% between 2014 to 2018, mostly from poaching and illegal hunting, with drought also a contributing … Continue reading

Oct 22

Bulimia tied to higher risk of heart disease and premature death

(Reuters Health) – Women hospitalized for bulimia may be more likely to develop heart disease and die prematurely, a recent study suggests. Researchers compared 818 women hospitalized for bulimia and more than 415,000 women hospitalized for pregnancy-related events. At the start, the women were 28 years old on average. During the next 12 years, the women hospitalized for bulimia had more than four times the risk of having events like heart attacks or strokes or dying than the other women in the study. “Bulimia is known to have acute implications for the heart, but the long term impact has not been previously studied,” said Dr. Nathalie Auger, of the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre. “This study shows that bulimia has implications for a wide range of cardiovascular disorders later in life, as well as death,” Auger, senior author of … Continue reading

Oct 22

Canadian election clears path for universal drug plan

TORONTO (Reuters) – Canada’s Liberal government is more likely to pass a universal prescription drug plan after losing its majority in Monday’s election, setting the stage for what would be the biggest shakeup of the country’s public healthcare system since it was created in the 1960s. The Liberals won the most seats in the election but fell short of a majority, which means Prime Minister Justin Trudeau will need the support of rivals like the left-leaning New Democratic Party (NDP) to govern. Both the Liberals and NDP have promised a new national drug plan. Canada is the only developed country with a universal health care system that does not cover prescription drugs for all, though a patchwork of provincial programs support the elderly and people with low income or very high drug costs. Most Canadians rely on employer-funded drug plans. … Continue reading

Oct 22

Most preemies are healthy in adulthood

(Reuters Health) – More than half of premature infants grow up to be healthy adults without chronic medical issues, a new study suggests. Researchers followed 2.56 million babies born in Sweden between 1973 and 1977 until they were 30 years old on average, including about 149,000 premature infants. Each decade, preemies’ odds of survival to adulthood improved, from about 91% of preterm infants born in the 1970s to about 96% of those born in the 1990s. About 55% of preemies in the study had no serious chronic physical or mental health issues by early adulthood, compared 63% of full-term babies, researchers report in JAMA. “Our findings reflect the apparent resilience of preterm birth survivors in maintaining good health,” said Dr. Casey Crump, lead author of the study and a researcher at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in … Continue reading

Oct 22

Biogen resurrects Alzheimer's drug; shares jump 27%

(Reuters) – Biogen Inc (BIIB.O) revived plans on Tuesday to seek U.S. approval for Alzheimer’s treatment aducanumab, surprising investors and saying data from more patients in two discontinued studies showed the drug reduced the decline of patients suffering from the disease. A sign marks a Biogen facility in Cambridge, Massachusetts, U.S. January 26, 2017. REUTERS/Brian Snyder/File Photo The drugmaker’s shares soared 27% in response to the decision, recouping almost all of the $18 billion lost from the company’s market value when it said in March it was abandoning the two studies. The field of experimental Alzheimer’s treatments is littered with high-profile failures, with many major drugmakers abandoning the race to develop a medicine for a disease that makes up 60-70% of an estimated 50 million cases of dementia globally. Any medicine that effectively treats the disease is likely to become … Continue reading

Oct 22

Novartis data suggest payers getting breaks on gene therapy Zolgensma

FILE PHOTO: Novartis’ logo is seen at the Swiss drugmaker’s plant in the northern town of Stein, Switzerland on October 23, 2017. REUTERS/Arnd Wiegmann/File Photo ZURICH (Reuters) – Novartis sales data on Tuesday suggested the Swiss drugmaker is reaping less than the $2.1 million U.S. list price for its gene therapy Zolgensma, as insurers may be getting breaks on the world’s most-expensive one-time treatment. The spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) treatment, approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in May, has reaped $175 million in revenue this year, including $160 million in the third quarter. On a call following third-quarter results, Chief Executive Vas Narasimhan said roughly 100 patients have been treated under the paid program. The figures would suggest it is receiving around $1.75 million per patient on average, a 17% discount to the U.S. list price. Novartis has … Continue reading

Oct 22

Idorsia's Clozel says recruitment delay won't dent Fabry drug prospects

ZURICH (Reuters) – Fledgling Swiss biotech Idorsia has suffered delays in recruiting patients for a key trial of its experimental lucerastat drug but that will not damage its commercial prospects, founder Jean-Paul Clozel told Reuters on Tuesday. FILE PHOTO: Jean-Paul Clozel, CEO of Swiss pharmaceutical company Idorsia, attends an interview with Reuters at the company’s headquarters in Allschwil near Basel, Switzerland May 15, 2018. REUTERS/Arnd Wiegmann/File Photo Clozel – who owns 28% of Idorsia shares with his wife, Martine Clozel, the chief scientific officer – was speaking after the company reported third-quarter loss stabilized at 120 million Swiss francs ($121.4 million) amid spending on four late-stage drug programs. Sluggish patient recruiting will push its lucerastat trial into 2021, Clozel said, adding the delay allows Idorsia to trim its 2019 overall spending forecasts to no more than 540 million francs on … Continue reading

Oct 22

Breast Cancer Awareness Bass Fishing Challenge!

Breast Cancer Awareness Bass Fishing Challenge!

Breast Cancer Awareness Bass Fishing Challenge! Yup, all pink lure challenge! Join the Gray Gang! – https://www.kendallgray1.com Buy Shirts- https://www.kendallgray1.com/shop Sweet Trail Camera: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B071LNRG2Z 10% OFF CODE: N6VRQQX3 MTB Promo Code: GRAYGANG MTB Link: https://www.mysterytacklebox.com Click here to SUBSCRIBE-https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCTrz3UN8LlvHjlDjy60NXlA?sub_confirmation=1 Add me on: Snap Chat- kendallgray6 Instagram- https://www.instagram.com/kendallgray1/ -Tag me in a photo and I’ll “Like” it! Include “#Jesus” and I’ll also comment! Mailbox! – Kendall Gray P.O. Box 724 Barbourville KY, 40906 Email- kendalljaygray@gmail.com

Oct 22

Reacting to Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis TV/Movie Scenes

Reacting to Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis TV/Movie Scenes

#foodallergy How did you react to these allergic reaction tv/movie scenes? Let me know in the comments! ☆ JOIN MY EMAIL LIST: http://www.nutritionallynicole.com/ ☆ ALLERGY FRIENDLY HOLIDAY SWEETS RECIPE EBOOK: https://payhip.com/b/9Adv ________________________ ☆ MY SOCIAL MEDIA ☆ Blog: http://www.nutritionallynicole.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/nutritionallynicole Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/nutritionallynicole Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/nutritionallyn

Oct 22

Climate change hampers progress on fighting epidemics: Global Fund

GENEVA (Reuters) – Climate change is making it harder to eradicate deadly epidemics, with rising temperatures helping mosquitoes spread malaria in higher places in Africa, the head of a global health fund said on Tuesday. Climate change activists attend an Extinction Rebellion demonstration in London, Britain, October 12, 2019. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls Other potential deadly consequences of climate change include more intense cyclones which leave an increased risk of infections in their wake, said Peter Sands, Executive Director of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. “Of the three diseases, the one most obviously affected by climate change is malaria,” Sands told journalists in Geneva. He described new, higher-altitude infections in Kenya and Ethiopia in East Africa as “very worrying”. The Global Fund, an alliance of governments, civil society and private sector partners, is pursuing a United Nations target … Continue reading

Oct 22

Biogen resurrects Alzheimer's drug; shares jump 37%

(Reuters) – Biogen Inc (BIIB.O) on Tuesday made a surprising reversal on its Alzheimer’s treatment with plans now to seek U.S. regulatory approval, after data from more patients in two discontinued studies showed that the drug improved cognition at high doses. A sign marks a Biogen facility in Cambridge, Massachusetts, U.S. January 26, 2017. REUTERS/Brian Snyder/File Photo The drugmaker’s shares soared 37% in premarket trade, erasing most of their losses this year that came after it abandoned two studies for the drug. Biogen and partner Eisai Co Ltd (4523.T) had in March decided to end two late-stage trials of aducanumab based on a so-called “futility analysis” of data, which revealed the trials had little hope of succeeding. The failure of the treatment, which was widely expected to be Biogen’s next blockbuster treatment, spurred demands on Wall Street for it to … Continue reading

Oct 22

Trump administration says Obamacare plan premiums to fall

A sign on an insurance store advertises Obamacare in San Ysidro, San Diego, California, U.S., October 26, 2017. REUTERS/Mike Blake/File Photo NEW YORK (Reuters) – Monthly premiums for an average 2020 Obamacare health insurance plan will fall about 4 percent from this year, according to a report released Tuesday by the Trump administration, which has tried to dismantle the program. The Trump administration has cut back on funding for the health insurance program, which was created by President Barack Obama as part of the Affordable Care Act and is often called Obamacare, and has sought to overturn it in Congress and legal courts. Obamacare provides needs-based subsidies to help low-income people buy health insurance. The administration has removed the mandate that Americans have health insurance or pay a fee. It also has allowed insurers to start selling insurance that does … Continue reading

Oct 22

Bristol-Myers' immunotherapies show promise in lung cancer trial; shares rise

(Reuters) – Bristol-Myers Squibb Co said on Tuesday an interim analysis of a late-stage trial testing a combination of its immuno-oncology drugs Opdivo and Yervoy met the main goal of extending life of previously untreated lung cancer patients. Shares of the company rose 5% to $56 in premarket trading. The company said its therapies when administered alongside two courses of chemotherapy demonstrated superior overall survival compared to chemotherapy alone in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer, the most common form of the disease. Data presented at a medical meeting last month showed that about 40% of patients with advanced lung cancer on the Opdivo-Yervoy combination were alive after two years, outperforming chemotherapy as a first-line treatment. Opdivo and Yervoy compete with rival drugs from companies such as Merck & Co and Roche in several types of cancer. Merck’s Keytruda … Continue reading

Oct 22

Biogen resurrects Alzheimer's drug; shares jump 35%

(Reuters) – Biogen Inc revealed surprise plans to seek U.S. regulatory approval for its Alzheimer’s treatment aducanumab on Tuesday, saying new analysis of clinical trials showed promise, just months after it had shelved two studies. A sign marks a Biogen facility in Cambridge, Massachusetts, U.S. January 26, 2017. REUTERS/Brian Snyder/File Photo The drugmaker’s shares, which has been under pressure from investors to beef up its drug development pipeline and also reported a better-than-expected third quarter profit, soared 35%, more than erasing all of its losses so far this year. Biogen and partner Eisai Co Ltd had in March decided to end two late-stage trials of aducanumab based on a so-called “futility analysis” of data, which revealed the trials had little hope of succeeding. The failure of treatment, which was widely expected to be the Biogen’s next blockbuster treatment, spurred demands … Continue reading

Oct 22

What is sex really for?

Few topics arouse as much interest and controversy as sex. This is hardly surprising. The biological continuance of the species hinges on it – if human beings stopped having sex, there would soon be no more human beings. Popular culture overflows with sex, from cinema to advertising to, yes, even politics. And for many, sex represents one of the most intimate forms of human connection. Despite its universality, sex and its purpose have been understood very differently by different thinkers. I teach an annual course on sexuality at Indiana University, and this work has provided opportunities to ponder sex from some provocative angles, including the body, the psyche and the spirit. Sex and the body Alfred Kinsey (1894-1956) was an insect biologist whose alarm at “widespread ignorance of sexual structure and physiology” led him to become perhaps the first major … Continue reading

Oct 22

Biogen to seek U.S. approval for Alzheimer's drug; shares jump 21%

A sign marks a Biogen facility in Cambridge, Massachusetts, U.S. January 26, 2017. REUTERS/Brian Snyder/File Photo (Reuters) – Biogen Inc is planning to file for U.S. regulatory approval for its Alzheimer’s treatment aducanumab after fresh analysis of its clinical trial showed promise, the drugmaker said on Tuesday, sending its shares up 21% before the bell. Biogen and partner Eisai Co Ltd had in March decided to end two late-stage trials of the treatment based on a so-called “futility analysis” of data, which revealed the trials had little hope of succeeding. Since the Alzheimer drug’s failure, Wall Street has been calling on Biogen to beef up its pipeline through deals, especially at a time when its peers are looking to sign multi-billion dollar acquisitions. The drugmaker said on Tuesday a new analysis of the discontinued studies, which looked at a larger … Continue reading

Oct 22

Kenya launches first breast milk bank to help newborns

Nairobi, October 22 (Reuters) – The five mothers sat in a bright blue room in Kenya’s largest maternity hospital waiting to pump breast milk – but not for their own newborns. Human milk waits to be refrigerated at the Human Milk Bank at Pumwani Maternity Hospital in Nairobi, Kenya October 17, 2019. Picture taken October 17, 2019. REUTERS/Njeri Mwangi At Kenya’s first breast milk bank, the women were waiting to help infants whose mothers couldn’t feed them by donating some of their own milk. Antibody-rich breast milk helps premature and sick babies recover faster. Although infants benefit most from their own mother’s milk, milk from donors – if safely collected and pasteurized – is a good alternative, the American Academy of Paediatrics says. Six months ago, the Ministry of Health and the African Population and Health Research Centre set up … Continue reading

Oct 21

Drug firms avert landmark opioid trial as talks on $48-billion settlement set to resume

CLEVELAND (Reuters) – Four large drug companies could resume talks on Tuesday to try to reach a $48 billion settlement of all opioid litigation against them, after agreeing with two Ohio counties to a $260 million deal to avert the first federal trial over their role in the U.S. opioid epidemic. Drug distributors AmerisourceBergen Corp, Cardinal Health Inc and McKesson Corp and drugmaker Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd agreed to the deal that removed the immediate threat of a trial that was to begin on Monday in Cleveland. The parties could resume talks as soon as Tuesday aimed at a broader settlement of thousands of opioid lawsuits brought by states and local governments, according to Paul Hanly, an attorney for the towns and counties. Under Monday’s local settlement, the distributors, which handle around 90% of U.S. prescription drugs, will pay a … Continue reading

Oct 21

October brings losses for short sellers in U.S. opioid-related shares

FILE PHOTO: A pharmacist holds prescription painkiller Hydrocodine Bitartrate and Acetaminopohen, 7.5mg/325mg pills, made by Mallinckrodt at a local pharmacy, in Provo, Utah, U.S., April 25, 2017. REUTERS/George Frey NEW YORK (Reuters) – October has been a rough month for short sellers betting against companies at the heart of the opioid crisis, although those traders still have paper profits of almost $600 million for the year, according to data from financial analytics firm S3 Partners. The data from S3 analyzed changes in short interest and profits related to shares of eight companies named in U.S. opioid litigation. In October, short sellers registered $324 million in mark-to-market losses from those shares. But for the year, they have still gained $593 million in mark-to-market profits. The list includes U.S. shares of drugmakers Mallinckrodt Plc, Endo International Plc and Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd, … Continue reading

Oct 21

Drugstore drones: UPS will fly CVS prescriptions to U.S. customers

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) – United Parcel Service Inc’s new Flight Forward drone unit will soon start home prescription delivery from CVS Health Corp. FILE PHOTO: A UPS drone makes a Flight Forward medical delivery on WakeMed Health & Hospitals’ main campus in Raleigh, North Carolina, U.S. in an undated photo. UPS/Handout via REUTERS/File Photo The service, which will debut in one or two U.S. cities in the coming weeks, shows how the parcel delivery company plans to expand its upstart drone business beyond hospital campuses. “Flight Forward will work with new customers in other industries to design additional solutions for a wide array of last-mile and urgent delivery challenges,” UPS Chief Strategy and Transformation Officer Scott Price said. The Atlanta-based company this month won the U.S. government’s first approval to operate a drone airline, leapfrogging rivals like Amazon.com Inc and … Continue reading

Oct 21

Vertex prices cystic fibrosis combo treatment at $311,000-per-year

(Reuters) – Vertex Pharmaceuticals Inc has priced its three-drug combination for cystic fibrosis (CF) at $311,503 per year, after winning early U.S. approval on Monday. FILE PHOTO: A view shows the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) headquarters in Silver Spring, Maryland August 14, 2012. REUTERS/Jason Reed/File Photo Shares of the drugmaker, which also raised its 2019 sales forecast for CF products, were up 3% in after-hours trading. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval, which comes five months ahead of the agency’s previously announced action date, greatly expands the percentage of cystic fibrosis patients that Vertex can treat. The drugmaker boosted its guidance range for CF products sales to between $3.70 billion and $3.75 billion, from $3.60 billion to $3.70 billion. The treatment, Trikafta, is a combination of three drugs that target a defective protein responsible for the life-threatening … Continue reading

Oct 21

Movement during class improves students' academic abilities

(Reuters Health) – When academic classes include physical activity, like squats or running in place, students do better on tests, a new study suggests. The idea of intertwining academic learning with physical activity has come about as more and more schools have cut back on physical education (PE), the researchers explain in the British Journal of Sports Medicine. Teachers say “time is the main barrier to physical education,” said coauthor Emma Norris of the Centre for Behavior Change at University College London. “Teachers would like to give pupils active time in breaks and PE but academic priorities and targets often mean active time is removed.” One workaround is to add physical activity to regular lessons, Norris said in an email. “Active lessons allow teachers to maintain academic time whilst also providing children with an outlet for activity,” she added. Still, … Continue reading